Eric Lefkofsky And Tempus: A Powerful Force In Cancer Care

Innovative technology developed by Chicago-based Tempus Labs is having a profound impact on cancer research and the quality of care delivered as a result. Co-founded in 2015 by serial entrepreneur, author, educator and philanthropist Eric Lefkofsky, Tempus has created a new platform that makes it possible for medical professionals to more efficiently use big data analytics. Tempus technologies helps with the sequencing of the DNA and RNA of tumors, cancer testing, working with the organoid cultures of tumor cells, as well as machine learning of the information gleaned from electronic medical records, medical imaging and pathology data.

The technology Tempus developed is so impactful Dr. Eric Topol has added it to the list of groundbreaking technologies that he publishes each year. The list also has innovative artificial intelligence based technology used for the diagnosis of eye diseases, Chimeric antigen receptor T Immunotheraphy for treating cancer, the blood pressure watch, the KardiaBand for diagnosing atrial fibrillation, new technology for gene editing as well as gene therapy, a deep-learning algorithm that was recently discovered that can help with diagnosing skin cancer and two recently created glucose sensors.

Tempus co-founder Eric Lefkofsky has long had an interest in business. While still in college at the University of Michigan, he started selling carpeting. After earning his juris doctor from the university’s law school, Lefkofksy played a seminal role in the creation of a host of other companies. One is a venture capital firm called Lightbank which has invested in more than 100 companies. Lefkofsky also co-founded Uptake, a company which improves the safety and operations of many companies. His best known company is Groupon. Through it Eric Lekofsky made the bulk of his $2.2 billion fortune.

Although Eric Lefkofsky grew up just outside of Detroit, Michigan, he has spent much of his adult life in Chicago, Illinois. He has been a longtime supporter of many Chicago businesses and cultural institutions. Through the Lefkofsky Family Foundation, Eric and Elizabeth Lefkofsky support educational, scientific and charitable causes and organizations worldwide. Children are the focus of the foundation’s work. The Lefkoskys joined The Giving Pledge in 2013.

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Radiation Therapy or Surgery, Find Out Dr. David Samadi’s View on the Most Effective Prostate Cancer Treatment Method

Dr. David Samadi, a leading American urologist, wrote an informative article on Huff Post, detailing why prostate surgery is more effective than radiotherapy at treating localized cancer. The article uses the experiences of Colin Powell and John Kerry, both of whom were diagnosed with prostate cancer and survived the ordeal.

Mitt Romney, the 70th Governor of Massachusetts and later the Republican Party’s nominee for President of the United States, recently joined Kerry, Powell and other American men who beat back prostate cancer. Romney was among 161,360 men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2017. Romney, luckily, was among over 130 thousand men who survived the disease.

Romney, Kerry, and Powell had the dilemma of picking a treatment method, and they opted for their prostates to be removed surgically. Dr. Thomas Ahlering surgically removed Romney’s prostate at UC Irvine Hospital. Romney is said to be in good health; The news that he is preparing to replace Orrin Hatch when he retires speaks to his perfect health after the life-saving surgery.

Dr. David Samadi’s article is an eye-opener for prostate cancer patients, who are torn between surgery and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy, according to Dr. David Samadi, is responsible for secondary cancers in prostate cancer patients. Such cancers include those of the rectum and the bladder. Radiation therapy, additionally, is criticized for sudden deaths in prostate cancer patients. Men treated with radiation are twice as likely to die from prostate cancer compared to their counterparts who chose surgery.

Surgically removing a man’s prostate upon testing positive for prostate cancer guarantees almost 100 percent chances of survival, especially if the cancer is localized—according to Dr. David Samadi. Statistics indicate that over 90 percent of American men diagnosed with prostate cancer have the disease affecting only the prostate. Men who opt for radiation and later on decide to go under the knife may develop serious complications, with urologists stressing that it is challenging to perform surgery after radiation therapy.

Dr. David Samadi

The renowned urologist is based at Lenox Hill Hospital. He is in charge of robotic surgery and urology departments at the medical facility. Dr. David Samadi stresses the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. He is known in the American health care industry as a “celebrity doctor,’’ because he frequents television, the internet, social media, medical publications, etc. He has a significant following on the internet because his speaking engagements are informative.

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Neuroscientist Jorge Moll May Have Proven That Humans Are Good By Nature

It is an age-old argument – are humans naturally pure or evil at baseline? There appears to be legitimate research being completed by Neuroscientists at the National Institutes of Health that suggest that the answer leans towards purity. Maybe humans truly are good by nature?


Fully into the holiday season, giving is something that is on many of our minds. Gift giving and other forms of donating time or money provide the giver with a warm and fuzzy positive feeling. But why?


Jorge Moll, Neuroscientist in Brazil and Internationally, is a senior researcher and educator who works with National Institutes of Health, the International Neuroethics Committee, as well as the Organization for Human Brain Mapping. Moll has been involved in some very compelling research that helps us explain why humans obtain that warm and fuzzy feeling when giving. The University of California Berkeley published information presenting that “…Jorge Moll and colleagues at the National Institutes of Health found that when people give to charities, it activates regions of the brain associated with pleasure, social connection, and trust, creating a “warm glow” effect.” Furthermore, “Scientists also believe that altruistic behavior releases endorphins in the brain, producing the positive feeling known as the “helper’s high,”


When speaking about their 2006 research Moll explains that “It helps convince people that doing good can make them feel good; altruism, therefore, doesn’t need to be only sacrificed.” Taking this information into consideration it really seems that humans are good by nature (IDOR). It appears to be hard-wired into our biological make-up, by evolutionary chemical reinforcement, to be good and to do good.


All in all, it is very exciting to see research-based information being released by Neuroscientists like Moll who are internationally recognized that prove, rather than simply suggest, that the answer to the good vs. evil argument points to good winning over after all.


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